2016-2017 Residential Electric Rebates
Click here for the application and program rules
  • Window solar screen rebate: $1/sq foot of window area up to a $300 credit
  • Added insulation rebate: $0.08/sq foot of conditioned living space up to a $300 credit
  • Duct Leak Repair: 50% of cost up to $200
  • 16 SEER Central A/C Heat Pump Rebate: 3-ton and under: $300; Over 3 ton: $500
  • Cool Roof Rebate: $0.14 per square foot of conditioned living space up to $375
  • Solar Attic Fan: 25% of installed cost up to $200 
saving money at home
Save up to $7.50 per month with our Load Management Program!
    Click here for details.

2016-2017 Commercial Electric Rebates
Click here for the application and program rules
  • Window solar screen rebate: $1/sq foot of window area up to a $300 credit
  • Added insulation rebate: $0.08/sq foot of conditioned living space up to a $300 credit
  • Duct Leak Repair: 50% of cost up to $200
  • 16 SEER Central A/C Heat Pump Rebate: 3-ton and under: $300; Over 3 ton: $500
  • Cool Roof Rebate: $0.14 per square foot of conditioned living space up to $375
  • Solar Attic Fan: 25% of installed cost up to $200 
  • High Performance Windows: $2/sq foot for max rebate of $300
  • LED EXIT sign: 50% of cost of installed sign , up to $75 per sign, for max. of five (5) signs per location
How to Save On Your Electric Bill 2014
Learn all about reducing your electric bill by saving energy
Click here for details.


Free Energy Audit
Click here for the application

UC electric customers can receive a FREE on site energy audit from our Florida-certified energy rater, Stan DiBello. This program offers you the opportunity to have your home or small business' energy consumption personally analyzed and learn what specific, energy-saving recommendations can to help you save money. 

Please note:   You must contact us to initiate our free energy audit. Our State of Florida certified energy rater is Stan DiBello. If you are contacted by anyone else without having requested an audit from the Utilities Commission and you have questions, please call our Customer Service Department at 386-427-1361.

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How to Read Your Electric Meter (from energy.gov/energysaver/articles/how-read-your-electric-meter)

The basic unit of measure of electric power is the Watt. One thousand Watts are called a kilowatt. If you use one thousand Watts of power in one hour you have used a kilowatt-hour (kWh). Electric utilities bill by the kWh.


The standard electric power meter is a clock-like device driven by the electricity moving through it. As the home draws current from the power lines, a set of small gears inside the meter move. The number of revolutions is recorded by the dials that you can see on the face of the meter. The speed of the revolutions depends on the amount of current drawn; the more power consumed at any one instant, the faster the gears will rotate.


When reading an electric meter, read and write down the numbers as shown on the dials from right to left. When the pointer is directly on a number, look at the dial to the right. If it has passed zero, use the next higher number. If the dial has not passed zero, use the lower number. Record the numbers shown by writing down the value of the dial to your extreme right first and the rest as you come to them. Should the hand of a dial fall between two numbers, use the smaller of the two numbers.


Note that some newer electric meters use digital displays instead of dials. The difference between one month's reading and the next is the amount of energy units that have been used for that billing period.


Surge Protection Service

Surge protection can keep your valuable electronics and motor appliances from being damaged as a result of a lightning strike affecting your electrical service. Most electricians in our area offer surge protection service for your home and/or business. To find out the name of a licensed electrical contractor, visit the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation website at www.myfloridalicense.com.

How Electricity Works


Most homes have two incoming voltages: 120 volts for lighting and appliance circuits and 240 volts for larger air conditioning and electric dryer circuits.


When an appliance switch is turned on, electrical current flows through the wire, completing the electrical "circuit" and causing the appliance to operate. The amount of flowing current is called "amperage." Most lighting circuits in the home are 15 amp circuits. Most electric dryers and air conditioners require larger 30 amp circuits.


The amount of electrical power needed to make an appliance operate is called "wattage" and is a function of the amount of current flowing through the wire (amperage), and the pressure in the system (voltage).


Mathematically speaking, volts x amps = watts. So, if we have a 120 volt system and a 15 amp current, we can flow a maximum of 120 x 15 or 1,800 watts on a typical lighting or appliance circuit. When too many lights or appliances are attached to the electrical system, it will overload and overheat. This can cause the wire insulation to melt and ignite, resulting in an electrical fire. The amount of electrical current flowing through wire is affected by resistance. This is known as "ohms." Resistance causes increased heat in the wire. Heat is the byproduct that makes some appliances work, such as an iron, toaster, stove or furnace. Large current faces high resistance when moving through a small wire. This generates lots of heat. That's how an incandescent light bulb works. Resistance through the light filament causes it to heat up which gives off a bright light. Electrical resistance also is affected by the length of a wire. Operating an electrical hedge clipper with a long extension cord increases resistance and might cause the cord to overheat, melt or ignite. The same occurs if too many strands of Christmas lights are connected together.


The size of electrical wire is dependent upon the amount of current required to operate a particular appliance. Wiring to the air conditioner, electric stove and electric dryer is much larger to handle the increased voltage (240) volts) and amperage (30 amps). Wiring is covered with a protective material called "insulation."


Electrical circuits in homes are designed so that all components are compatible. The size of the wire, outlets and circuit breakers are designed for an anticipated electrical load. A circuit is said to be overloaded when too much current flows causing heat build up or wiring to break down. When two bare wires touch, a "short circuit" is said to occur. This can lead to sparks and fire. Deteriorated insulation is one of the most frequent causes of short circuits.


A "circuit breaker" or "fuse" is a safety device designed to prevent accidental overloading of electrical circuits. They are set at a specific amperage. When that amperage is exceeded, it trips and shuts off the flow of electricity, stopping the circuit from continued overheating. When a fuse or circuit breaker trips, it is important to find the cause and correct it. Often, people will just reset the breaker or put in larger fuse. NEVER USE OVERSIZED FUSES ON CIRCUIT BREAKERS. NEVER SUBSTITUTE A PENNY OR FOIL-WRAPPED FUSE. This could cause a fire.