Electric & System Operations
 
The Utilities Commission, City of New Smyrna Beach is one of the 34 public power communities throughout Florida.  Together, UCNSB and the other community-owned utilities serve 3 million Floridians and are collectively the third largest source of power in the state. Because we are community-owned and locally managed, we focus on serving local needs, through low rates, jobs and contributions to the city budget. Revenue is not distributed to stockholders; instead, it is reinvested back into the community to fulfill our Vision: "To improve the quality of life for our customers by being the best utility service provider."

The Utilities Commission’s electric service area encompasses 71.9 square miles, of which 34 square miles are inside the New Smyrna Beach city limits. The service area is established by the Florida Public Service Commission.

The Utilities Commission electric system has 115 kV interconnections with Florida Power & Light and Duke Energy. The Utilities Commission owns and maintains approximately 231 miles of overhead and 33 miles of underground electric circuits. The electric system is monitored 24 hours a day by System Operations employees from the Electric Operations Center located on SR 44. Line crews reporting to this location maintain and improve the system, responding to customer requests and/or outages to provide affordable, safe, and reliable service to our customers. 

Municipal utilities are consumer-owned and not-for-profit, so providing affordable, safe, and reliable power is our first priority. Fuel and purchased power costs are the largest single variable expense for electric utilities, and they can vary greatly on the basis of supply and demand and other factors. Under utility regulations, these costs are passed along to customers at cost, through a charge on their bill commonly referred to as a“fuel adjustment fee.” Utilities do not profit from increased fuel and purchased power costs.

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